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Mayangani

Paulvi Ngimbi

The installation by Paulvi Ngimbi and Prisca Tankwey is conceived as an interaction of media from different artistic worlds, creating a language that is carried by the symbolic elements present. There are many questions that have to do with appearance, spirituality and the relationship to the divine in their immediate surroundings. The question of life and death is also answered by universal symbols such as the white, illuminated skulls. This large installation, where light and colour collide, contains a kind of dome inspired by cupolas or medieval European church architecture, wrapped in a print of stained glass windows with non-biblical narratives. Here, Prisca invites viewers into eclectic conversations against a backdrop of old family photographs, asking personal questions that focus on resolving the psychosocial complexities that pervade her society. A kind of collective exorcism.

Paulvi Ngimbi is a Congolese artist living and working in Kinshasa, where he was born in 1997. He is the co-founder of LaboratoiʼArt, a collective based in Kinshasa that focuses on contemporary art practices. In 2019, he graduated from the Académie des Beaux-Arts de Kinshasa. He is currently an assistant professor in the sculpture department at the Académie. Multidisciplinary artist: sculptor, photographer, video artist, performer and installation artist. He has participated in various group exhibitions and workshops, such as Laboratoire Kontempo 2020, at the Académie des Beaux-Arts with his installation “Ekulusu”; as well as “Images en mouvement et créateurs en puissance” organised by the SADI collective, with his art video “Résistance” at the Centre Mont des Arts in Kinshasa; as well as his photo series “Kuzu” exhibited at the Académie des Beaux-Arts in 2018 as part of the same project.
As a creator of contemporary artworks whose specificity lies in the mixture of different techniques, his work is a research and mix of heterogeneous media and concepts. Currently, he combines sculptural installations and videos with sounds from the folk culture of Kinshasa, referencing the past and focusing on the paradox between the sacred and the profane in this society.